Archive for the ‘Current eyewear trends’ category

Lady Gaga sports strange tassel sunglasses in New York.

May 7th, 2015

Even though this is one of her better style choices (getting flashbacks of that meat dress yet?), Lady Gaga’s tinted tassel sunglasses are still rather strange.

In fact, we can’t help but think she has nicked the tassels from her grandma’s curtains!

Gaga arrived at LAX airport on Friday (17 April) clutching her adorable little black pooch, Asia, in this dark ensemble complete with a wide brimmed suede hat and a jet black cape coat that showed off her tattooed arms.

Lady Gaga Sunglasses

© Rex Features / Broadimage

Lady Gaga’s bodyguard comes to the rescue

But it looks like odd sunnies soon began to obstruct her view, as the award winning singer was forced to hand poor little Asia over to her body guard while she waded through a sea of paps, who had arrived to meet her on her return from a performance in Nevada earlier this week.

At least the star didn’t topple over, hound in hand!

Translated from https://www.reveal.co.uk/fashion/news/a642546/lady-gaga-sports-strange-tassel-sunglasses-in-new-york.html

5 Summer Hairstyles & Trendy Sunglasses To Pair While You Enjoy All This Glorious Weather

May 7th, 2015

It’s finally that time of year again: soaking up the sun on lunch breaks, weekend strolls around the neighborhood, and, of course, experimenting with summer hairstyles andtrendy sunglasses. I know, I didn’t think it would ever happen either! What better way to celebrate the season than rocking some sunnies and ‘dos that even The Sartorialist would wanna capture for Insta?

There isn’t one! So to honor this momentous shift in our social calendars — happy hours al fresco, anyone? — I’ve rounded up 5 of our favorite sunnies trending amongst the fashion elite and paired them with low-effort ‘dos any lazy gal can master on-the-go. After all, with rising temperatures and increasingly packed schedules, who has time to fuss over appearances? As a wise group once said, “it’s summertime and the livin’s easy.”

Don’t be afraid to experiment with playful patterns, bold finishes or experiemental frames this year. With the introduction of cool-kid startups like Warby Parker shaking up the scene, quality eye wear with a sense of style has never been more accessible. And thanks to social phenomenas like #IWokeUpLikeThis, undone hair is more a fashion statement than a lack of effort. Without further ado, meet the five looks that’ll rule your beauty arsenal ‘til fall:

1. Bold Prints & Lady-like Tresses

Take a hint from the leading ladies of a bygone era and don a paired down version of the 1950’s Hollywood starlets. Frames dressed up in bold prints, like this silvery animal print, add sass to any outfit. Whether a true cat-eye or a more subtle version like these Etnia Barcelona pair, strutting a deep side part and sweep of your favorite red shade is the perfect modern ode to Sophia and Marilyn.

2. Clear Frames & Half Buns

With the Brooklyn sensibility spreading like wild fire — we’re looking at you Portland and Pittsburgh — it’s no surprise their style is infiltrating the fashion scene too. Half ponies are no longer exclusive to your nineties-childhood-photo-nightmares; they’re new and improved and now comes in bouncy bun form. Perfect for greasy hair days, match the cool girl half bun with clear frames, like these ones from Warby Parker.

3. Mirrored Lenses & Sleek Ponies

Origin: cocky state troopers or Cancun-bound frat boys? Debate still withstanding, nearly every style board on Pinterest boasts a pair of mirrored shades, now. And I don’t hate it. Knockaround’s more feminine version take a cue from the summer sunset. Rocked with a sleek pony, orange lip and monochrome outfit, you’re set for a stroll on South Beach, Montauk, or just down to your favorite coffee shop.

4. Matte Frames & Loose Braids

When in doubt, take small risks. A modern twist on a proven classic is the formula for success, like these Brooklyn Spectacles. A black, menswear-inspired frame takes on new life with a matte finish. It’s simple, it’s elegant, it should be a go-to. To avoid looking too stiff, twist your locks into a casual braid — one that looks like you slept in it. Achieve this perfectly undone plait by lightly pulling at individual sections and loosening pieces around your face. Heck, just run your fingers through it!

5. Uniframes & Top Knot

OK, fine. I invented the term “uniframe” — I think. Sunnies are no longer simply two lenses and two ear pieces, brands have upped the ante by creating cool and complex frames that flip, twist, and even feature little bridges between your eyes. In my opinion, Etnia Barcelona nails it again with this brilliantly bad ass pair. We’ll takeTerminator ’tude with a side of cobalt blue any day. Complete the combo with an out-of-this-world top knot and leather bomber for ultimate post-apocalyptic domination. Poker face sold separately.

Translated from https://www.bustle.com/articles/79387-5-summer-hairstyles-trendy-sunglasses-to-pair-while-you-enjoy-all-this-glorious-weather

The Sunglasses Trend That Took Over Coachella

May 7th, 2015
Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Grace Hitchcock

On a bright Summer day, you wouldn’t want to step outside without your sunglasses. But at Coachella, where festivalgoers romp around, eager to show off their personal style, regular old lenses aren’t enough. That’s why everyone’s pulling out their eye-catching, mirrored shades in the desert.

These styles reflect the sunlight, illuminating and accenting the colors of your outfit. Whether you choose a round, ’70s-inspired silhouette, aviators, or a playful design that boasts prints or heart-shaped rims, mirrored sunglasses aren’t just an average accessory.

Read on for all the standout glasses we found at Coachella, and see how they’ve quickly become the latest trend on everyone’s radar. Then go ahead and pick up a pair of your own. Trust us, you’ll want to wear these far beyond the festival. We won’t even call you out if you forget to take them off after dark.

Translated from https://www.popsugar.com/fashion/Mirrored-Sunglasses-Coachella-2015-37267933#photo-37267933

Retro chic and futuristic looks in sunglasses

April 23rd, 2015

The first rays of sunshine have burst through for the Northern Hemisphere, so the time has come to find the perfect pair of sunglasses to look like a star while still protected from UV rays. Shapes, colours, lenses: focus on the latest trends for the 2015 spring/summer season.

Faguo, in collaboration with Lesca, offers a unisex model called ‘Gabin’ in a very ’60s style.©Faguo/Lesca Faguo, in collaboration with Lesca, offers a unisex model called ‘Gabin’ in a very ’60s style.©Faguo/LescaCertain trends last, and for good reason — retro being the perfect example since, once again this year, there are plenty of vintage-style models to choose from. Thankfully though, not every brand agrees on this point, giving the holdouts a chance to present their more future-looking wares.

Aviator-style frames

No surprise with this one: aviators will once again be in style this year. This retro look gets revisited every year, and though brands only barely tweak the ultra-iconic shape, they do however play with the details (temples, rhinestones, lenses, patterns, materials). Mixing retro with futuristic is a sure way to impress.

Though Ray-Ban is the brand most obviously linked to aviator-style sunglasses, many others continue to release various versions of this legendary look every year. Tom Ford has aviator styles including Cyrille (US$535, about RM1,960), Charles Round (US$320) and Marko (US$380).

The red ‘Madeleine’ retro chic design by Jérémy Tarian.©Jérémy TarianThe red ‘Madeleine’ retro chic design by Jérémy Tarian.©Jérémy TarianThe futuristic look ‘Dior Technologic’.©DiorThe futuristic look ‘Dior Technologic’.©DiorBack to the ’60s

Sunglasses will travel back in time this summer to the 1960s. A round shape will be prevalent in models with different colours, decorated with prints or in a more subdued look. This trend also marks the return of tortoise shell-style temples that were so in style in the ’60s.

For this season, Faguo has collaborated with eyewear brand Lesca to produce a unisex model in acetate named Gabin, which highlights this spotted pattern. It’s a limited series, with only 30 being produced, and priced just under US$200.

Jérémy Tarian is also offering a retro chic limited edition for around US$300, the round “Madeleine” model, available in red to add some pep to your look.

Futuristic looks

Certain brands have chosen to stand out and present futuristic designs as an alternative to the retro trend. That’s notably the case with Dior and the US$400 Dior Technologic model, seen in their summer 2015 show, with its pantos shape, metal open-worked frame (available in silver and gold), ultra-flat tone-on-tone lenses and matte black acetate temples. — AFP-Relaxnews

- See more at: https://www.themalaymailonline.com/features/article/retro-chic-and-futuristic-looks-in-sunglasses#sthash.Qv2LWuUF.dpuf

3D Printed MONO Eyeglasses Hit Indiegogo Looking to Bring Affordable Custom Frames to Market

April 23rd, 2015

While there has been great advancement in the technology of creating prescription and corrective lenses, there has seemingly been little to no advancement to the frames that hold those lenses. Eyeglasses frames, while often available in a large assortment of styles, are still only made in a single general size that wearers are simply expected to make work on their head, regardless of any individual fit issues.

Because eyeglasses frames are only made in a single size, your average consumer is going to have a fit issue at some point and they’re just going to have to live with it. The problem is that there are simply too many variables and producing glasses on a mass scale in multiple sizes would be too expensive. While a t-shirt is generally only going to have about four sizes, to properly fit frames to everyone’s face it would require potentially dozens of sizes.

3dp_mono_featureBut a new startup called ITUM is looking to change that using a unique sizing system and 3D printing to make affordable, custom-made eyewear available to everyone without added cost. In fact, a single pair of custom-fit prescription MONO glasses is comparable in price to most one-size-fits-all pairs that you would purchase traditionally.

3dp_mono_stylesThe sizing system has three base measurements–the front width of the frame, the nose pad width, and the length of the wearer’s temples–and each of those itself has three measurements. The width of the frame options are sized S (128mm), M (134mm), or L (140mm). The width of the nose pad options are S (18mm), M (15mm), or L (12mm). And the length of the temples size options are S (90mm), M (100mm), or L (110mm). Once someone knows their unique frame size using these sets of measurements, they can get the perfectly sized pair of glasses in any of the styles available.

And because the MONO is 3D printed in a single piece, there are no parts that need to be assembled and fit. And the lack of moving, individual parts will reduce the chances of the glasses coming apart or breaking. This also cuts the weight of the frames nearly in half, so not only will MONO fit better, but they won’t feel as heavy on the wearer’s face. The temples also have a unique DNA joint that allows the glasses to comfortably conform to your head and fold closed when not in use. 3dp_mono_frame_close

The flexible frames also allow for a wide variety of lens colors and options. MONO can be the wearer’s main pair of prescription eyeglasses, a pair of prescription sunglasses, or a non-prescription fashion accessory. And rather than needing to purchase two or more pairs of glasses, you can simply purchase multiple lenses so your reading lenses can easily be swapped out for a pair of prescription tinted sunglasses.

And if the round lens, Harry Potter style just isn’t your thing, don’t worry. MONO is available in five different frame styles, including the standard Round and Rectangular options, Ful Vue, Wayfarer, and of course Aviator. And all of these options are in turn available in four colors: Black, White, Blue, or Red.3dp_mono_colors

The Indiegogo campaign is looking to raise $50,000 to pay for bulk purchase of the lenses and the materials to 3D print the glasses. A single pair of prescription glasses will only set you back $99, while you can get them with an additional set of tinted prescription lenses for only $119.

Here is the Indiegogo campaign video:

So what do you think? Is the future of eyewear going to be a lot more comfortable with 3D printed, custom frames like MONO? Let us know what features you would want in a pair of custom glasses on the 3D Printed MONO Eyeglasses forum thread over on 3DPB.com

Translated from https://3dprint.com/57029/mono-eyeglasses-indiegogo/

Vintage fashion is staging a comeback in Bollywood

April 13th, 2015

Vintage fashion has come a long way — literally! What was probably the way of life then is now a fashion statement. With films such as Lootera, Once Upon A Time in Mumbaai, Detective Byomkesh Bakshy! and Bombay Velvet reprising the bygone era in recent times, celebrities are seen flaunting flared pants, cat eye glasses and vintage updos. The free-spirited vibe of vintage clothing can also be seen replicated in couture pieces on the ramp.

Actress Anushka Sharma
In her upcoming film, Bombay Velvet, Anushka Sharma’s look is enhanced by a ’70s-inspired updo

For those who think vintage clothing is just about getting inspired by the past, think again. In the quest for dressing unique, it easy for someone to look like he/she just got out of the past. Therefore, it’s important to understand how to balance your outfits.

Team a tea-length skirt with a crop top/jacket to up the glam quotient
Team a tea-length skirt with a crop top/jacket to up the glam quotient

The designer’s take
Designers designing for period films have a huge challenge at hand. Re-creating the old warm charm is far from easy. “The most important thing one needs to keep in mind while designing for a period film is the script. The ambience which the clothes exude should be in sync with what the script demands,” says designer Raghavendra Rathore who designed for Eklavya (2007). Quiz him on the challenges of designing for a vintage-inspired film and he says, “Designing for a period film requires a holistic approach, one needs to keep it real and make it look worthy without literally aping the style from the past. Music plays an exceptionally important role in helping one achieve this.”

Vintage accessories go a long way in making your look more authentic
Vintage accessories go a long way in making your look more authentic

Designer Narendra Kumar Ahmed says that when it comes to working on a period film the biggest challenge that any designer faces is that of research and finding visual references, “As far as the ’90s and ’2000s is concerned, one can easily access all reference material such as hair, make-up, dressing among others on the internet, however, it is difficult to acquire material dating back to the ’30s-’40s.

A jacket paired with a churidar-kurta is an interesting period look
A jacket paired with a churidar-kurta is an interesting period look

We always keep in mind that we pay utmost attention to detailing and scout for authentic reference material. In addition to that, the body language of the actor/ actress who is essaying the lead roles, how he/she carries it and how comfortable they are in their attire are aspects that cannot be ignored” Several films have successfully experimented and incorporated some clever and distinct looks from the past.

You may opt for hair accessories such as headbands and studded pins to get a vintage look
You may opt for hair accessories such as headbands and studded pins to get a vintage look

Right from bell-bottoms to bell skirts to flared pants, we’ve seen them all make a return and how. And it’s not just the clothes that are seeing a revival of sorts, even make-up and accessories are enjoying a moment on the fashion scene. The cat eyeglasses, winged eyeliner, oversized headbands; the bouffant and head accessories galore are all reminiscent of vintage fashion.

Sonakshi Sinha’s  cat-eye glasses are characteristic of vintage fashion
Sonakshi Sinha’s cat-eye glasses are characteristic of vintage fashion

Dolly Ahluwalia who designed costumes for Haider says that for her, sourcing the right kind of fabric is the main element. “The garments worn by women of the Victorian era or before had a certain fall, stitch and lining. It is important to be able to replicate those to get the authentic look. Also, at no point can we undermine the importance of jewellery and footwear. These accessories are what completes your look, modern or vintage,” she says.

Vintage fun
Vintage in essence, is chic, feminine and fun, and perfectly encapsulates the vibe of the fun, fearless female who likes to experiment with her outfits. “If you want to incorporate vintage in your own personal wardrobe, just pull out some of your grandma’s clothes and make them work! Wear the right kind of prints and make sure they look earthy and dated for a distinct look,” says celebrity stylist, Ami Patel.

Experiment with Greek sandals and short dresses for a chic look
Experiment with Greek sandals and short dresses for a chic look

If you’re a self-confessed fashionista, shop for all things vintage without holding back. Fabric prints, florals, pencil skirts, if blended well with the other elements of your attire, all say ‘vintage’ loud and clear. To incorporate vintage fashion in your attire is a skill. “You can team a pair of jeans with a lace top or corset. Pairing a pair of greek sandals with a short dress will also help get the vintagy feel,” explains Ahluwalia.

Sushant Singh Rajput wears dhoti-kurta with a jacket to reprise the look of the Calcutta bhadralok of the 1930s
Sushant Singh Rajput wears dhoti-kurta with a jacket to reprise the look of the Calcutta bhadralok of the 1930s

“The best way to incorporate vintage clothing in your wardrobe is to avoid dressing vintage from head to toe as that makes you look passé, instead opt for one vintage element. For instance, women could opt for a tea-length skirt and team it with a tank top or crop jacket. Men could wear a voluminous bottom and balance that out with a fitted shirt,” adds Kumar.

- See more at: https://www.mid-day.com/articles/vintage-fashion-is-staging-a-comeback-in-bollywood/16115164#sthash.Ptg7DM2g.dpuf

It’s all about…these lightweight oversized Maui Jim sunglasses!

March 20th, 2015

mauijim

Escaping to warmer climates? We don’t blame you. We’d do a runner too if we could. The freezing cold weather has us wishing for summer like never before.

Along with your bikini, passport and party dress, don’t forget to pack your sunnies. And if you’re on the hunt for a new pair, look no further. Available in 5 colours, these oversized sunglasses by Maui Jim paired with a flattering bikini, will have you feeling like a movie star.

The go-to brand for lightweight sunglasses, Maui Jim offers a wide range of styles. So if the oversized shape isn’t really for you, you’re definitely guaranteed to find a style to suit your needs, especially with their amazing selection of choice Maile Sunglasses,£215 available at Maui Jim.

What eyewear was trending at Mido?

March 19th, 2015

Mido 2015 was an exhibition for the world of optics with an outstanding array of products spread between the maze-like pavilions. Overall there were 1,000 exhibitors in attendance. The Fashion District areas were the place to be for all of the big names in the industry offering giant stands, luring in their guests with bars, food and even girls in hot tubs. New independent start-up brands were launching their innovative products in the Lab Academy area. Robert Morris, founder of William Morris eyewear, said that Mido was even better than expected this year: ‘I think it is really great that the Lab Academy is there for young and new independent brands. That is Mido supporting young talent. We always question how big our presence has to be but I think it’s definitely a necessity to be here at Mido.’

The show was a sneak peak into what can be expected for eyewear fashion this year. Both inside the exhibition and outside on the street it was evident that the Italians step out in style. Sunglasses seem to be a wardrobe staple no matter what the season. Bella Figura, literally translated as ‘Beautiful Figure’ is a saying that is integrated within the Italian culture and way of life. It means to be presented well, both in appearance and behaviour. The Italians place a huge emphasis on making a good impression to portray this image of Bella Figura and a large part of that comes down to dressing well. Whether it’s to the local bar for your daily coffee or to mass on a Sunday, people dress to impress. The frames on display at Mido were definitely a reflection of this high standard. Cirillo Marcolin, president of Mido, explains: ‘We filled every square metre that was available so we had to be very selective with the entries and our objective was to keep a high standard for the show. One hundred and forty nine companies are here for the first time. It is important to us to have something for every single customer coming in. This event is very international with two-thirds of visitors coming from abroad.’

Milan is a fitting location for Mido, being the business centre of Italy and the fashion capital of the world. Trends seen throughout the pavilions included new materials, shapes and methods of production with an emphasis on new styles in optical ranges. Michela Broglia, group PR specialist for Luxottica, explains: ‘Optical frames are becoming an accessory for us even more so than sunglasses. Frames are being used now as a personal business card and people are changing their shapes a lot more now than in the past. We think that the trend of heavier frames will continue to grow year after year. People are wearing natural lenses meaning that they don’t need a prescription. They are wearing these frames as a fashion accessory. We are not going in the direction of very classic and less visible frames, but instead making them super visible.’

Material world

A big trend seen at the show was the mixing of materials. Acetates with metal, horn with wood and leather with rubber. The overriding objective in both sun and optical was to be lighter and more comfortable.

French eyewear label Vuarnet launched its first range of ophthalmic frames at Mido in 2014 and its second collection this year at the show. The Clip On model was launched last year but has only now become available in the UK. The Crochet model is predicted to be the trend of 2015 featuring heavy acetate, a lot of flash in the lenses and soft silicone tips designed for fit and comfort around the ear.

Crochet by Vuarnet

Crochet by Vuarnet

The Glacier sunglass model was launched exclusively at Mido in matt black. Like all of Vuarnet’s sunglasses they have mineral lenses. This is a technical product using metal, acetate and rubber featuring a leather removable sports band and leather magnetic side shields for improved vision and eye protection. Both the Glacier and Crochet are finding a balance between technology and fashion using these new materials. Once very popular in the 1980s, the brand has made a comeback after becoming independent three years ago and re-launching its products.

Glacier by Vuarnet

Glacier by Vuarnet

Elsa Ravaud, communication and marketing assistant for Vuarnet, says: ‘Now the focus is on the sporty chic style like a mix between Nike and Celine. The idea is always to be elegant with a sporty and dynamic spirit. We hope to target younger people now. Since the relaunch sales have definitely grown and the identity of Vuarnet is stronger and clearer.’

Distribution to the UK is very selective with the aim to bring a more trendy style to that market. Vuarnet is currently available from only three retailers in the UK but more are set to come.

Dunelm presented 130 new styles at Mido, all of which were optical. Managing director Peter Beaumont has seen a variety of new materials being applied to the Paul Costelloe range for this season, including rubber arms eliminating the need for spring hinges and mixing acetate frames with three different types of wood in frames such as PC 5124 and 5125. The wood is resin coated, making adjustments easier with longer lasting colour. Aluminium frames are due to launch in autumn because this year it’s all about lightweight materials such as carbon fibre for Dunelm.

Paul Costello 5132 from Dunelm

Paul Costello 5132 from Dunelm

‘We’re doing a lot of thinner frames, wide sides are definitely on the way out and you can feel the difference in weight,’ says Beaumont. Racing car favourite carbon fibre is used in PC 5132 for strength and durability.

The new Janet Reger range was previewed for the first time at Mido and is set to launch at Optrafair. Her lingerie line inspired the lace-work featured on the sides of frames such as 4131. This range is made using all Italian materials with leather inserts and Swarovski diamantes for sparkly detail.

Janet Reger 4131 from Dunelm

Janet Reger 4131 from Dunelm

New brands for Marcolin this year are Pucci and Ermenegildo Zegna both launched at Mido. Zegna is 100 per cent for men and uses a variety of materials including wood throughout the range. Frame ZC0005 from the couture range features handcrafted buffalo horn. Details in the frames include a chevron pattern embedded in the temple.

Zegna ZC0005 from Marcolin

Zegna ZC0005 from Marcolin

Perry Moore, managing director of Marcolin, has a confident outlook for 2015: ‘I can safely say that within the next six months we will be the third biggest distributor in the UK for optical,’ he says.

Technologies take over

Blake Kuwuhara had his new brand featured in the Lab Academy making his first appearance with the brand at Mido. After designing a collection for his previous brand KATA, it’s his first eponymous range. Kuwahara was recently named by Brilliant Magazine as one of the ‘100 Most Important People in the Eyewear Industry.’ In the past he has also collaborated on eyewear collections for John Varvatos, Carolina Herrera, Isaac Mizrahi, Behnaz Sarapfour, Hanae Mori, and Coach. The Blake Kuwuhara range features some very technical pieces.

Isidore by Blake Kuwahara

Isidore by Blake Kuwahara

‘The concept behind this collection was really to cater to a client who has a creative background like design, architecture, photography or fashion but who also straddles the business world,’ explains Kuwuhara. ‘They want frames that are artful but also wearable. It’s difficult to find that middle zone in the market. They’re often classic or too forward or too trendy, asymmetrical and fluorescent.’

The way he achieves this look is essentially by creating two frames and lamenting them together. One is the inside frame which is a separate unit and then the outside frame which is also made separately. When lamented as one it creates positive and negative spaces allowing for a unique look.

‘The lamination process takes about two weeks to make sure there are no bubbles and it’s actually a very complicated process. This limits our production so they are only available in 100 boutiques worldwide,’ says Kuwuhara.

The technology used is not only for the look of the final product but also the feel. ‘It’s about touch. You can feel the different cutting in the frame and extra dimensions. From the side there is no break in the end piece because there’s no split where the front and the temple join. It’s very smooth and pure in its form.’

Le Vau & Thornton by Blake Kuwahara

Le Vau & Thornton by Blake Kuwahara

The collection was made for retail in January this year and distribution is just getting started in the UK.

Look Occhiali launched its brand Helios in January this year featuring the Hindie sunglasses. This model is a sport utility frame that can be used comfortably under a helmet. The Helios Hercules glass lenses are certified as unbreakable and with Clearseal treatment that makes water run away from the lens without leaving a residue or obstructing your vision catering to extreme weather conditions. The range is inspired by the Italian Dolomites so all models feature polarised lenses and 99.9 per cent black crossing to guarantee an sharp image.

Helios Hindie by Look Occhiali

Helios Hindie by Look Occhiali

Colours bloom

Bright colours were a trend seen throughout all of the pavilions at Mido, not only in the frames but also in the lenses. A lot of the sun ranges are featuring ‘flash’ lenses in a variety of colours and many brands are mixing colours to create exclusive tones for their individual ranges.

Mondottica previewed its new brand Marimekko for the first time at Mido that is due to launch around September this year. This is the first optical line for the Finnish brand which is already well established in Scandinavia and Asia for its fabric prints and jewellery. The Marimekko home wares are quite successful in the UK, retailing in high-end stores. The range of eyewear features the famous fabric prints scaled down and recoloured to suit the frames.

Marimekko Vuokko from Mondottica

Marimekko Vuokko from Mondottica

Yuen Sum Cheung, brand manager at Mondottica, explains: ‘It’s very Scandinavian in the way it’s really minimalist but also very bold and punchy. It’s aimed at a very vivacious woman who knows herself and likes to be womanly but not too soft. There are some beautiful colour contrasts like black and pink or brown and green.’

The collection is all about colour contrasts, iconic prints with a geometric 1960s vibe. The Marimekko jewellery range directly inspires colour pops in the temples of the frames. Mondottica expects success for 2015. ‘Distribution in the UK has grown so quickly with double digit growth year on year and we’re forecasting another 20 to 30 per cent growth as a company as a whole,’ says Cheung.

Marimekko Annika from Mondottica

Marimekko Annika from Mondottica

The Spring/Summer range from William Morris is bringing in bright and fun colours inspired by the city. The most recent shoot for the campaign was done on location around London in the trendy areas of Brick Lane, the South Bank and Hoxton in East London. Smooth pastel tones, delicate gradients and vibrant colour ways are seen throughout. Detailing in trims and finishes are making for some interesting pieces.

William Morris WL6961

William Morris WL6961

‘The more that eyewear is becoming a fashion accessory instead of just a medical necessity makes us start pushing the boundaries,’ comments Morris. ‘We used to always say our brand was conservatively different. Now I would drop the conservatively. I think we’re becoming more different but still not extreme fashion. Very wearable but definitely less conservative.’

Overall, Mido was a show room of fun and innovative frames. Although the large and bold shapes are still prominent there is a definite focus on going lighter for comfort and metals are becoming more prominent. 2015 appears set to be a fashion forward year with optical frames becoming more popular. The days of feeling ‘uncool’ for having to wear glasses are long gone and it is now a way to top off your signature look. Whether it is for work or play, this year there are frames to suit every occasion. To ensure your patients have ‘Bella Figura’ this season choose frames with an interesting mix of materials, sophisticated technological features and go bold with your colour selection.

Translated from https://www.opticianonline.net/eyewear-trending-mido/

5 Men’s Eyewear Brands You Should Know

March 19th, 2015
Stylish Eyewear

We’ve come a long way since classing eyewear as painfully unfashionable ‘medical appliances’. Initially intended as optic aids, glasses are today considered less correctional devices, more outfit-enhancing accessories. The scope of options available on the current market ranges from neutral and barely there frames to thickset and boldly patterned styles.

Still, with the huge choice on offer, it’s all too easy to fall foul of fashion and find yourself spending far too much on something shoddily crafted, so read on to get the lowdown on five of eyewear’s most highly regarded brands, from Germany to Japan…

1. Mykita

Founded by Moritz Krueger, Philipp Haffmans, Daniel Haffmans and Harald Gottschling in 2003, Berlin-based Mykita is an example of unparalleled German design.

Out of a workshop located in the German capital’s central district of Mitte, the brand produces hand-assembled spectacles and sunglasses crafted to the highest standard, with styles ranging from trend-led acetate designs to ultra-light stainless steel frames. The name itself stems from the German Kita, a common abbreviation for Kindertagesstätte, which nods to the brand’s first premises in a former day nursery.

Unsurprisingly, their smart combination of distinctive design and impressive engineering has won them interest from some of fashion’s most experimental designers and brands. Names Mykita have partnered with to create limited edition collaboration collections include Damir Doma, Bernhard Wilhelm and, most recently, Maison Martin Margiela.

If technical prowess and simple styling is what you’re about, Mykita’s got what you’re looking for.

Although they have stores in several countries including Germany, Colombia, Switzerland and the US, their online store remains the best bet for UK fans.

Web: www.mykita.com

Lookbooks & Campaigns

Mykita Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Mykita Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Mykita Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Mykita Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Current Styles
  • ARNOLDArnold
  • AUGUSTAugust
  • CARLTONCarlton
  • JOHNJohn
  • BENTBent
  • WILLYWilly
  • MYKITA GILES ROUND-FRAME SUNGLASSESMykita Giles Round-frame Sunglasses
  • MYKITA MAPLE LIGHTWEIGHT METAL SUNGLASSESMykita Maple Lightweight Metal Sunglasses
  • MYKITA GILES ROUND-FRAME SUNGLASSESMykita Giles Round-frame Sunglasses
  • MYKITA MYKITA X MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA SUNGLASSES 201471Mykita Mykita X Maison Martin Margiela Sunglasses 201471
  • MYKITA GLOSSY GOLD TAULANT SUNGLASSESMykita Glossy Gold Taulant Sunglasses
  • MYKITA DASH LIGHTWEIGHT ROUND-FRAME METAL SUNGLASSESMykita Dash Lightweight Round-frame Metal Sunglasses
2. Cutler And Gross

The oldest of our edit’s two UK-based brands, Cutler and Gross was born in 1969, when Graham Cutler and Tony Gross opened their first flagship store at 16 Knightsbridge Green, London.

The duo handcrafted their undeniably British frames in a workshop above the store, quickly building a customer base within the capital’s fashion set. On showing their collection at Paris Fashion Week in 1982, Marie Wilkinson joined the company as design director, building on Cutler and Gross’ creative vision and transforming a successful UK business into a celebrated global brand.

Renowned for its distinctive creative direction, the brand’s current autumn/winter 2014 lookbook stars SHOWStudio editor and one-to-watch fashion journalist Lou Stoppard modelling its women’s eyewear and Canadian-born furniture designer Philippe Malouin modelling its men’s frames.

Cutler and Gross remain true to their founding principle of craftsmanship, producing in their own factory in Cadore, Italy. Shunning many luxury brands’ fondness for prominent logos, each style is simply numbered and the brand name rendered in gold foil on the inside right hand temple. See their website’s ‘Frame Craft’ page for a detailed overview on how it’s all done.

Mykita Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

When it comes to aesthetics, it’s difficult to pin Cutler and Gross down due to the sheer breadth of choice the company offers in both their sunglass and optical ranges every season. Suffice to say, there’s likely to be something for everyone provided you lean more towards a British-flavoured, subtle quirkiness, rather than the stark and severe lines of a brand like Mykita.

They’re readily available throughout the UK due to both their own stores and a good network of stockists, including Mr Porter and MatchesFashion.com.

Web: www.cutlerandgross.com

Lookbooks & Campaigns

Cutler And Gross Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Cutler And Gross Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Cutler And Gross Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Cutler And Gross Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Current Styles
  • 0692 MELBOURNE0692 Melbourne
  • 0755 BLUE0755 Blue
  • 1061 MATT DARK TURTLE / HONEY TORT1061 Matt Dark Turtle / Honey Tort
  • 1074 GRAD BROWN AMBER1074 Grad Brown Amber
  • 0916 BRASS0916 Brass
  • 0164 OLIVE / GREEN TWEED0164 Olive / Green Tweed
  • CUTLER AND GROSS ROUND-FRAME MATTE-ACETATE OPTICAL GLASSESCutler And Gross Round-frame Matte-acetate Optical Glasses
  • CUTLER AND GROSS TWO-TONE SQUARE-FRAME OPTICAL GLASSESCutler And Gross Two-tone Square-frame Optical Glasses
  • CUTLER AND GROSS D-FRAME ACETATE SUNGLASSESCutler And Gross D-frame Acetate Sunglasses
  • CUTLER AND GROSS AVIATOR-STYLE SUNGLASSES 144768Cutler And Gross Aviator-style Sunglasses 144768
  • CUTLER AND GROSS DOUBLE-RIM WAYFARER-STYLE SUNGLASSES 217533Cutler And Gross Double-rim Wayfarer-style Sunglasses 217533
  • CUTLER AND GROSS TRANSPARENT FRAME SUNGLASSES 144780Cutler And Gross Transparent Frame Sunglasses 144780
3. Garrett Leight California Optical

The brainchild of Garrett Leight, son of Oliver Peoples founder Larry Leight, Garrett Leight California Optical (or GLCO, for short) started out in California in October 2012.

Building on his time working directly on Oliver Peoples, and the brand’s spin-off collection, Mosley Tribes, Leight debuted a new vision for eyewear rooted in the laid-back California coast lifestyle (quite literally – each pair of frames is engraved with the Venice, CA zip code: 90291).

As one of the youngest brands on the list, GLCO mix timeless silhouettes with a dose of cool, offering neutral and brightly coloured tortoiseshell wayfarers and aviators. Though their range isn’t quite as comprehensive as some of the other brands that made the list, GLCO are a dab hand at brand building.

Understanding the importance of creating a world for their customer, GLCO don’t just manufacture high quality products, they actively foster the arts that inspire them too. In April 2013, the brand rented out the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica, CA to screen Heading West, a short film by GLCO filmmaker Joey Indrieri. GLCO also publish Spectacle, a print magazine covering everything from eyewear (of course) to what Cali couples like to cook at home.

See their daily updated Instagram profile to see life filtered through California lenses, from sunsets on the beach to surfing perfect waves.

Find them at several opticians throughout the UK or shop the full collection online at their store.

Web: www.garrettleight.com

Lookbooks & Campaigns

Garrett Leight California Optical Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Garrett Leight California Optical Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Garrett Leight California Optical Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Garrett Leight California Optical Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Garrett Leight California Optical Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Current Styles
  • WESTMINSTERWestminster
  • PALMSPalms
  • WILSONWilson
  • GARRETT LEIGHT CALIFORNIA OPTICAL BROOKS D-FRAME POLARISED SUNGLASSESGarrett Leight California Optical Brooks D-frame Polarised Sunglasses
  • GARRETT LEIGHT CALIFORNIA OPTICAL BENTLEY D-FRAME MATTE-ACETATE GLASSESGarrett Leight California Optical Bentley D-frame Matte-acetate Glasses
  • GARRETT LEIGHT CALIFORNIA OPTICAL DUDLEY DEGRADE ACETATE GLASSESGarrett Leight California Optical Dudley Degrade Acetate Glasses
  • GARRETT LEIGHT CALIFORNIA OPTICAL WILSON ROUND-FRAME STAINLESS-STEEL MIRRORED SUNGLASSESGarrett Leight California Optical Wilson Round-frame Stainless-steel Mirrored Sunglasses
  • GARRETT LEIGHT CALIFORNIA OPTICAL HARDING D-FRAME ACETATE SUNGLASSESGarrett Leight California Optical Harding D-frame Acetate Sunglasses
  • GARRETT LEIGHT CALIFORNIA OPTICAL VENEZIA TORTOISESHELL ACETATE SUNGLASSESGarrett Leight California Optical Venezia Tortoiseshell Acetate Sunglasses
  • GARRETT LEIGHT KINNEY BUTTERSCOTCH SUNGLASSES WITH PURE GREEN LENSESGarrett Leight Kinney Butterscotch Sunglasses With Pure Green Lenses
  • GARRETT LEIGHT BROOKS MATTE ESPRESSO CLIP-ON SUNGLASSES WITH CR-39 LENSESGarrett Leight Brooks Matte Espresso Clip-on Sunglasses With Cr-39 Lenses
  • GARRETT LEIGHT LINCOLN BLACK PEWTER SUNGLASSES WITH PURE GREY LENSESGarrett Leight Lincoln Black Pewter Sunglasses With Pure Grey Lenses
4. Eyevan

Hailing from Japan, Eyevan was established in 1972 by Optec Japan Corporation, in cooperation with the cult brand responsible for taking American Ivy League prep out east: VAN Jacket.

The brand’s first collection featured a total of twenty-seven styles and forty-two variations, all nodding to post-war American collegiate silhouettes that were popular at the time. As the label grew, Eyevan took their wares stateside, exhibiting at a US tradeshow in 1985 and securing a global fan base for their designs.

Today, the Japanese brand is known mostly for its 7285 collection. Debuted in May 2013, 7285 looks to the company’s extensive archives for inspiration, drawing on sketches and designs dating from 1972 to 1985 to create an edit of eyewear styles that manage to strike a balance between vintage-inspired and contemporary.

Both the sunglasses and optical ranges feature silhouettes that point to the company’s past (round tortoiseshell and 1970s-era mustard coloured frames) and present success (sleek monochrome acetate frames), with all models still manufactured in Japan.

Find them at the brand’s luxuriously furnished Tokyo-Roppongi flagship or online at Mr Porterand Colette.

Web: www.eyevan7285.com

Lookbooks & Campaigns

Eyevan Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Eyevan Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Eyevan Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Eyevan Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Eyevan Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Current Styles
  • MODEL 307Model 307
  • MODEL 712Model 712
  • MODEL 716Model 716
  • EYEVAN 7285 D-FRAME ACETATE OPTICAL GLASSESEyevan 7285 D-frame Acetate Optical Glasses
  • EYEVAN 7285 ROUND-FRAME ACETATE OPTICAL GLASSESEyevan 7285 Round-frame Acetate Optical Glasses
  • EYEVAN 7285 638 SQUARE-FRAME ACETATE OPTICAL GLASSESEyevan 7285 638 Square-frame Acetate Optical Glasses
  • EYEVAN 7285 306 ROUND-FRAME ACETATE OPTICAL GLASSESEyevan 7285 306 Round-frame Acetate Optical Glasses
  • EYEVAN 7285 538 ROUND-FRAME METAL AND TORTOISESHELL ACETATE SUNGLASSESEyevan 7285 538 Round-frame Metal And Tortoiseshell Acetate Sunglasses
  • EYEVAN 7285 308 ROUND-FRAME TWO-TONE ACETATE SUNGLASSESEyevan 7285 308 Round-frame Two-tone Acetate Sunglasses
  • EYEVAN 7285Eyevan 7285
  • EYEVAN 7285Eyevan 7285
  • EYEVAN 7285Eyevan 7285
5. Cubitts

Taking it all back to basics is King’s Cross, London-based brand Cubitts. Established in 2012 with the intention of providing high quality handcrafted prescription opticals and sunglasses for a modest price, Cubitts’ eyewear retails at just £100 per pair, and that’s including delivery.

The arrival of Cubitts’ Home Trial service also heralds a new way to shop for eyewear in the UK: browse its online store to choose up to four frames (use the Virtual Try-on tool to help you make up your mind) and trial them at home for free for up to five days.

Each pair of frames goes through a fifty stage production process over a period of six weeks. It’s obvious Cubitts are obsessive about it too, with each of their online store’s product pages crammed full of illustrative diagrams and high quality photography, as well as information on the name behind the style.

Obviously, Cubitts’ main draw is their online home trial system but if you want to get a real feel for these glasses, you can find them at London independent menswear store Albam’s Islington branch.

Web: www.cubitts.co.uk

Lookbooks & Campaigns

Cubitts Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Cubitts Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Cubitts Eyewear, Opticals and Sunglasses Lookbook/Advertising Campaign

Current Styles
  • MARCHMONT AMBERMarchmont Amber
  • ARGYLE DARK TURTLEArgyle Dark Turtle
  • CALTHORPE BLACKCalthorpe Black
  • HERBRAND LIGHT TURTLEHerbrand Light Turtle
  • AMPTON DARK TURTLEAmpton Dark Turtle
  • BRUNSWICK LIGHT TURTLEBrunswick Light Turtle
  • AMPTON DARK TURTLEAmpton Dark Turtle
  • CALTHORPE AMBERCalthorpe Amber
  • WICKLOW LIGHT TURTLEWicklow Light Turtle
  • ARGYLE LIGHT TURTLEArgyle Light Turtle
  • MARCHMONT BLACKMarchmont Black
  • HERBRAND DARK TURTLEHerbrand Dark Turtle
Final Word

It’s clear to see that the eyewear industry has evolved, with many specialist brands now producing high quality, meticulously crafted eyewear that not only performs, but looks stylish too.

No longer viewed as unfashionable or a hindrance, a great pair of optical frames has the power to become a signature of your look – something that reinforces your personality and cements your style credentials.

But what do you make of the five eyewear brands above, and which is your favourite? Any other brands that you think should have made the list?

As always, let us know in the comments section below…

Translated from https://www.fashionbeans.com/2014/5-mens-eyewear-brands-you-should-know/

Victoria Beckham Revitalizing Eyewear Collection

March 19th, 2015

FRESH SIGHT: Victoria Beckham is placing new emphasis on her sunglasses collection. The designer, who launched eyewear in 2009, has enlisted a fresh roster of manufacturers to help “spice” up her collections. The collection was previously manufactured in partnership with Cutler and Gross. She will continue to use their services along with a bevy of other “specialists,” including lens producer Zeiss. “It was important for me to evolve existing styles and develop new pieces for my retail partners and my own store and Web site and we now have the ability to do this,” Beckham said. “For me, it is about the line continuing to expand and incorporating the best materials and techniques possible. It is an exciting time for the category.”

A visual from Victoria Beckham's eyewear collection.

Beckham will debut her new manufacturing initiatives with a capsule collection of colorfully lensed aviator styles that incorporate Zeiss’ handiwork. They will exclusively retail at Barneys New York for $550 for basic styles up to $1,255 for aviators laden in 18-karat gold.

A spokeswoman declined to specify other factories that Beckham has begun working with this season but said they are all located in Italy’s Valdobbiadene region. Further details will be unveiled when Beckham’s new collection launches at eyewear trade show Silmo Paris in September.